Friday, May 01, 2009

GR6S, GR6, TYPE 6 and Torch Relay Lamp

Hi Robert,
the GR6S is a development of the GR6 and Type 6, it has a stainless steel outer wick tube.
the GR6S is the current gas testing lamp for uk coal mines, the lamp is a flame trap ie you cannot put a flame in ( other than via the internal relighter) or take one out.
the lamps with a bung in the glass are a modified GR6S used for the Olympic and other Torch Relays. This enables the continuity of the flame to be maintained but allowing it to be carried safely on board aircraft.
regards david

robert smith wrote:
hello there,just been admiring your protector lamps on your web site,can you tell me what the differences are between the gr6s and the gr6,i can see from the pictures the gr6s has the flint striker,am i right in thinking the gr6 is lit via the hole in the glass then sealed with plug.many thanks mr paul smith

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

hi have just purchased an eccles type 6 protector lamp and cannot or dont know how to light it can you help nicola x

david mather said...

Type 6 needs relighter spirit or ronson lighter fuel or petrol, lamp oil will not light with a spark.

Anonymous said...

I have just acquired a type 6 lamp.Do the approval numbers have any meaning ?.Can this be used to used to establish the production date of the lamp ? and Are some lamps more valuable than others ?.

please advise.

Anonymous said...

How does the magnetic lock work on a type6? I cant get mine apart to clean it. Thanks

david mather said...

The GR6 came first as a development of the Type 6. The brass wick tube was prone to burning, so it was replaced with a stainless steel tube, becoming the GR6S.
The lamps with the hole in the glass are only used for Torch Relays.

Paula said...

Hello. I am wondering what you can tell me about the lantern you have designed for the Vancouver 2010 torch relay. What is it made of? How long will each lantern burn? Is there any special or different about this lantern than previous torch relay lanterns? Thanks!

david mather said...

Hi Paula,
Protector has been making miners lamps since 1873, it is now our family business.
The lamps are used for gas testing in UK coal mines, as such they are a safety approved flame trap so are ideal for transporting a flame on a plane.
The idea of using miners lamps for the torch relays started with the Melbourne games in the late 1950's, Miners from Germany provided the lamps.
We became actively involved for the Sydney games as our lamps were used in coal mines in Australia. Since then we have provided lamps to the Hellenic Olympic Committee for all games as well as the lamps for Athens,Torino, Shanghai ( Special Olympics), Beijing and now Vancouver. We also did lamps for the Central African Games in Dohar and the Pan American Games in Rio.
As you know the flame is continuous from Olympus so by transferring it into one of our lamps the continuity is maintained, also the lamps can be refueled while the flame continues to burn. It can then be safely transferred to the open torches wherever it lands.
We were approached by Bombardier last year and met with them in at our factory in Eccles near Manchester in April along with a representative from the Torch Relay Team. We supplied them with 10 lamps for the relay.
The links below are to some of our archive info on torch relays;

http://www.protectorlamp.com/gwc.htm

http://www.protectorlamp.com/torchrelay.htm

Anonymous said...

I HAVE A TYPE 6 LAMP AND THE BOTTOM WILL NOT COME OFF.
IT HAS NOT BEEN OFF IN 25 YEARS.
IS THERE A SPECIAL WAY OF GETTING IT OFF.
THX
JEFF CONSTANCE

david mather said...

depends whether its a magnetic or lead lock, the former needs a lamp opening magnet.Leave it on your ch boiler overnight and then use plenty of wd40, it should then unscrew. If you search our blog archive you will fing more articles on this.

Anonymous said...

Do the lamps used in the olympic torch transport (on aircraft) produce any significant amount of carbon monoxide?

david mather said...

The flame is the same as a small candle and produces the normal gases of combustion. They are used in confined spaces for mining and the amount of carbon monoxide produced has not been considered a hazard so it has not been specifically tested for that.However the lamps are normally used where there is an element of ventilation or air circulation. The lamps main purpose in coal mines is to check for methane/firedamp. The lamps secondary purpose is to check for bad air ( a lack of oxygen) including CO and C02;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackdamp
In these circumstanecs the flame will go out as bad air etc will not support combustion.
At that point the area would be vacated until proper ventilation is introduced as there is a danger of asphyxiation.

Anonymous said...

Hi
I got the 6 model.
It need repair to fix it.
Can you help me with that.
Regards
Michael mor
E-mail:mor5@bezeqint.net

Anonymous said...

I have a gr6 lamp but cannot get it to stay alight I have tried all sorts of fuel including the lighter fuel and petrol any ideas. It does not seem to take much fuel when i insert via the side inlet, I have even tried sitting it in a pot of petrol to let it soak.. But the flame will only stay alight for 5 minutes or so. I have 2 of these lamps and both have the same issue so I assume I am doing something wrong.

Anonymous said...

How much are the type 6 lamps worth?

david mather said...

Probably needs the wick changing see our YouTube videos;
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE429A8F2546F2C27&feature=view_all

dirigible fan said...

Hello,

I have an SL lamp. There are lots of stampings and numbers on it. Do those mean anything. I am rather interested in finding when it was made. Oh, it does have an asbestos washer so that helps but....

Thanks in advance

David Mather said...

Apologies our blog is very out of date and we were unable to access it for some time. We use our web site now for blogging. This is more an archive. Look for a 2 digit number, for example; 66/ was made at Eccles in 1966. Yes the washers are asbestos. In the pre 1970's lamps blue asbestos at the top and white at the bottom. Both are now illegal and hazardous.

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